Discussion:
music
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Jimmy the kid
2006-11-10 13:11:52 UTC
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why cant musician do classical music now?
Jimmy the kid
2006-11-10 13:14:46 UTC
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Post by Jimmy the kid
why cant musician do classical music now?
i mean you dont get classical music no more these day. just pop music
Thomas R. Sareks
2006-11-11 20:15:19 UTC
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Post by Jimmy the kid
Post by Jimmy the kid
why cant musician do classical music now?
i mean you dont get classical music no more these day. just pop music
i would suggest to turn off the
TV and look for Pärt, Gorecki, Glass, Reich, Hanson... some of them you will
find on youtube.




-t.
Arthur Ness
2006-11-11 20:45:40 UTC
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He can turnonthe BBC, too.
Post by Thomas R. Sareks
Post by Jimmy the kid
Post by Jimmy the kid
why cant musician do classical music now?
i mean you dont get classical music no more these day. just pop music
i would suggest to turn off the
TV and look for Pärt, Gorecki, Glass, Reich, Hanson... some of them you will
find on youtube.
-t.
John Briggs
2006-11-11 23:33:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jimmy the kid
Post by Jimmy the kid
why cant musician do classical music now?
i mean you dont get classical music no more these day. just pop music
i would suggest to turn off the TV and look for Pärt, Gorecki, Glass,
Reich, Hanson... some of them you will find on youtube.
Hanson? The '90s boy band?
--
John Briggs
Jimmy the kid
2006-11-10 13:16:14 UTC
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Post by Jimmy the kid
why cant musician do classical music now?
does this making sense?
Sandy
2006-11-11 16:27:49 UTC
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Post by Jimmy the kid
why cant musician do classical music now?
Dear All,

I have never heard the St. Matthew Passion. (If I have the
misfortune to hear a great composition on the radio, I have to switch it
off because the _performance_ is invariably self-involved, mewling and
poisonous. I can't abide modern artists and modern recordings [*]: the
virtue went out of things some time in the eighties, by your leave, by
your leave.)

Please, would anyone recommend -- and elaborate on their love for --
any _older_ recordings of J.S. Bach's "St Matthew Passion"?

With kind regards,

Sandy

* Of course -- by your leave -- there are exceptions: if Trey Parker
and Matt Stone and the town of South Park did a recording of the St
Matthew Passion, I would of course order the CD immediately. M'kay.
--
Alexander Anderson <***@alma-services.abel.co.uk>
(Yorkshire, England)

Where there is no vision, the people perish.
David Gray Porter
2006-11-11 17:51:38 UTC
Permalink
Did Gustav Leonhardt ever record it with the group he was using in the '70s?
Post by Sandy
Post by Jimmy the kid
why cant musician do classical music now?
Dear All,
I have never heard the St. Matthew Passion. (If I have the
misfortune to hear a great composition on the radio, I have to switch it
off because the _performance_ is invariably self-involved, mewling and
poisonous. I can't abide modern artists and modern recordings [*]: the
virtue went out of things some time in the eighties, by your leave, by
your leave.)
Please, would anyone recommend -- and elaborate on their love for --
any _older_ recordings of J.S. Bach's "St Matthew Passion"?
With kind regards,
Sandy
* Of course -- by your leave -- there are exceptions: if Trey Parker
and Matt Stone and the town of South Park did a recording of the St
Matthew Passion, I would of course order the CD immediately. M'kay.
--
(Yorkshire, England)
Where there is no vision, the people perish.
Peter T. Daniels
2006-11-11 19:22:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Gray Porter
Did Gustav Leonhardt ever record it with the group he was using in the '70s?
I suspect OP wants something soupy like Klemperer (who certainly had an
all-star cast).

Any number of historic performances taken from airchecks are available
-- I have one where the only name in big letters is Kathleen Ferrier.
And also one led by G. Wallace Woodworth in Boston in the late 30s (or
during the war?) with the Harvard-Radcliffe choruses. It claims to be
sung in English, but the sound isn't clear enough to be sure, and it
doesn't include the texts.

For an early proto-HIP performance, there's Richter I (Richter II
didn't get good notices); Suzuki is of course superb (I don't know if
you can get it separate from the St. John), and I don't know either
Herreweghe (nor why he chose to remake it).
Wayne Brown
2006-11-13 17:02:12 UTC
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Post by Sandy
Please, would anyone recommend -- and elaborate on their love for --
any _older_ recordings of J.S. Bach's "St Matthew Passion"?
I like Karl Richter's 1958 performance of it.
--
Wayne Brown <***@bellsouth.net> (HPCC #1104)

Þæs ofereode, ðisses swa mæg. ("That passed away, this also can.")
"Deor," from the Exeter Book (folios 100r-100v)
El Klauso
2006-11-15 17:53:57 UTC
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The recording of Bach's "St. Matthew Passion" that preserves a live
performance by the Concertgebouw Orchestra of Amsterdam under the baton
of Willem Mengelberg is an irreplaceable historic stylistic document,
linking us directly to performance traditions and instrumental
sonorities of the romantic era, which W.M. miraculously preserved
during his impressively enduring tenure.

Mengelberg's life-long familiarity with the score - it was evidently a
seasonal feature of Amsterdam music life from the 1890's - means that
one is hearing a truly practiced interpretive schema. Mengelberg was
legendary not only for his interpretive subjectivity, but also for the
technical polish he brought to his performances. The clarity of
instrumental and massed choral vocies as well as clearly weighed
balances are readily apparent, even in this vintage recording.

Also on display is Mengelberg's unique - here the word is properly
employed - subjective interpretive style. HIs tempo modifications,
sweet orchestral sonority and lush phrasing are just some of the
interpretive devices at his disposal. Despite the huge number of
subjective episodes and impulses apparent in his performance, the
overall impression conveyed is that of a single dramatic purpose and
utterance. There is no feeling of gestures 'tacked on' for effect, only
a hightened rhetorical sense of drama, illuminating Bach's musical
narrative.

For a very different but quite compelling approach, the Blanche
Moyse-directed recording of the score - with her Marlboro area troops
and a good selection of soloists - is an extremely personal performance
of the work, informed by a certain emotional subjectivity encompassed
by a larger objectivist-humanist stance. As is the case of the
Mengelberg, her long familiarity with the score leads to a feeling of
inevitability of interpretive choices, which make the musical/dramatic
experience a quite satisfying one.

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