Discussion:
Christian music
(too old to reply)
Barry Gray
2009-05-05 11:02:59 UTC
Permalink
First, this place is supposed to be about classical music. Second,
the thought of using music to brainwash young people into corrosive
superstition just about makes me gag.
Actually it's supposed to be about Bach, a Lutheran, and whether you
yourself are a Christian or not you cannot listen to or understand
Bach if you dismiss Christianity as a corrosive superstition.
--
Barry Gray
http://www.barrygray.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk
A child is a fire to be lit not a vessel to be filled
YDOD
2009-05-05 13:45:05 UTC
Permalink
This is nonsense. There is no doubt of the importance of religion to Bach
but there is no reason why an atheist cannot appreciate his music as much as
any other human any more than say a christian cannot admire the beauty and
workmanship of a mosque. They are both wonderful examples of human endeavor
no matter what inspired them.
Post by Barry Gray
First, this place is supposed to be about classical music. Second,
the thought of using music to brainwash young people into corrosive
superstition just about makes me gag.
Actually it's supposed to be about Bach, a Lutheran, and whether you
yourself are a Christian or not you cannot listen to or understand
Bach if you dismiss Christianity as a corrosive superstition.
--
Barry Gray
http://www.barrygray.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk
A child is a fire to be lit not a vessel to be filled
Barry Gray
2009-05-05 17:51:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by YDOD
This is nonsense. There is no doubt of the importance of religion to Bach
but there is no reason why an atheist cannot appreciate his music as much as
any other human any more than say a christian cannot admire the beauty and
workmanship of a mosque. They are both wonderful examples of human endeavor
no matter what inspired them.
Post by Barry Gray
First, this place is supposed to be about classical music. Second,
the thought of using music to brainwash young people into corrosive
superstition just about makes me gag.
Actually it's supposed to be about Bach, a Lutheran, and whether you
yourself are a Christian or not you cannot listen to or understand
Bach if you dismiss Christianity as a corrosive superstition.
Top posting makes this difficult to follow, but I did not say, and do
not believe, that non-Christians cannot appreciate Bach. In the same
way many non-Moslems, including myself, find Islamic art and
architecture very moving. But then I do not dismiss Islam as a
corrosive superstition.

In every generation there has been no shortage of people who regard
all, or all other, faiths as superstitions: it is the word *corrosive*
in the OP that drew my initial comments.
--
Barry Gray
http://www.barrygray.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk
A child is a fire to be lit not a vessel to be filled
YDOD
2009-05-05 13:45:05 UTC
Permalink
This is nonsense. There is no doubt of the importance of religion to Bach
but there is no reason why an atheist cannot appreciate his music as much as
any other human any more than say a christian cannot admire the beauty and
workmanship of a mosque. They are both wonderful examples of human endeavor
no matter what inspired them.
Post by Barry Gray
First, this place is supposed to be about classical music. Second,
the thought of using music to brainwash young people into corrosive
superstition just about makes me gag.
Actually it's supposed to be about Bach, a Lutheran, and whether you
yourself are a Christian or not you cannot listen to or understand
Bach if you dismiss Christianity as a corrosive superstition.
--
Barry Gray
http://www.barrygray.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk
A child is a fire to be lit not a vessel to be filled
Raveem
2009-05-19 14:50:34 UTC
Permalink
The BBC series recently exploring English music mentions how
professional musicians had only one route in Purcell's time: through
the Church. So it was a necessary influence on even the most atheistic
of great musicians at the time. (NB: I'm not denigrating the influence
here, just stating the situation. Indeed, I'm inclined to think it was
very positive.)

Raveem.

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